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Lonicera japonica

Lonicera japonica Thunb.

Lonicera japonica Thunb. var. aureo-reticulata (T. Moore) G. Nicholson

Lonicera japonica Thunb. var. chinensis (P.W. Watson) Baker

Nintooa japonica (Thunb.) Sweet

Japanese Honeysuckle

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae (from Stearn’s Botanical Latin)
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassAsteridaeA large class that encompasses asters
OrderDipsacalesIncludes viburnum, honeysuckle, snowberry, beautybush, twinflower, many others
FamilyCaprifoliaceaeHoneysuckle family
GenusLoniceraEither Latin for honeysuckle, though this is not a “true” honeysuckle; or named for Adam Lonitzer (1528-1586), a German herbalist, physician and botanist who wrote a standard herbal text that was reprinted many times between 1557 and 1783
Speciesjaponica“From Japan”

About plant names...

Japanese honeysuckle is native to eastern asia: parts of China, Japan, and Korea. It has become naturalized in much of the rest of the world, including North America; in some habitats it is considered an invasive species.

Here are some honeysuckles:

 

Lonicera japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle)

Flowers turn from white to yellow as they age. · 5/5/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Pepperell, MA
≈ 7 × 4½" (17 × 11 cm) ID is uncertain

Lonicera japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle)

6/19/2011 · NJ
≈ 7 × 4½" (17 × 11 cm)

 
Lonicera fragrantissima
You are here
Lonicera japonica

Lonicera sempervirens
Common Name

Winter Honeysuckle

Japanese Honeysuckle

Trumpet Honeysuckle
Plant Shrubs are 3-9½' (1-3 m) around A vine up to 16' (5 m) in size. Young stems are reddish- or light-brown, while older stems are hollow, with peeling bark Trumpet honeysuckle is a twining vine 3-20' (91-609 cm) long, depending upon what it has to climb over. Bark is orange-brown, and peeling.
Flowers Blooms are a creamy white color, in pairs, appearing in March-April, and very fragrant, with a lemony smell Flowers are white, showy, fragrant, about 1" (2.5 cm) in size. They fade to a yellow color, so the vine appears to have white and yellow flowers In clusters of 2-4, each red or orange with yellow interiors, 1-2" (2.5-5 cm) long, trumpet-shaped. They appear from April to July.
Leaves Leaves are opposite, roughly oval, with smooth edges Leaves are opposite, roughly oval-shaped, with smooth edges. Younger leaves may have lobes Roughly oval in shape, opposite, bluish green, and 1-3" (2.5-7.6 cm) long. Leaves at the base of flowers are fused at the base.
Fruit Orange to red berries up to ⅜" (1 cm) across Black, about ⅛" (3.2 mm) around Berries are orange-red to deep red in color
Range/ Zones

USDA Zones: 4-8

USDA Zones: 4-9
Type Wild Wild Wild
Occurrence      

 

 
Lonicera tatarica

Justicia spicigera
Common Name

Tatarian Honeysuckle

Mexican Honeysuckle
Plant Densely branched shrub, up to 10-12' (3-3.7 m) around 3-4' (91-121 cm) high and 4-6' (1.2-1.8 m) around
Flowers Pairs of flowers, each about ¾" (1.9 cm) around, may be white, pink, or rose. Each flower has five spatula-shaped, somewhat unruly-looking petals, and five anthers Bright orange, tubular in shape
Leaves Leaves are oval in shape, with smooth edges and a bluish cast, 1½-2½" (3.8-6.3 cm) long × 1-1½" (2.5-3.8 cm) wide, in opposite pairs Roughly oval, soft and velvety, up to 3" (7.6 cm) long
Fruit Berries are orange to red, about ¼" (6.3 mm) in diameter, often lasting through the winter  
Range/ Zones

USDA Zones: 9-10
Type Wild Wild
Occurrence Common to invasive  

 

Identification: Japanese honeysuckle is very robust—a rapidly spreading vine that spreads by roots, aboveground runners, or seeds. They can reach 16' (5 m) in size. Young stems are reddish- or light-brown, while older stems are hollow, with peeling bark. Leaves are opposite, roughly oval-shaped, with smooth edges. Younger leaves may have lobes. Flowers are white, showy, fragrant, about 1" (2.5 cm) in size. They fade to a yellow color. Most of the time it looks like there are two differently colored flowers on the bush. Japanese honeysuckle berries are black, about ⅛" (3.2 mm) around. Native honeysuckle berries are red to orange.

Edibility: Flowers can be used for nectar, and leaves parboiled for use as a vegetable. Leaves contain somewhat toxic saponins, so boiling in ample water is necessary to remove them. Tea can also be made from leaves, buds, and flowers.

Online References:

Lonicera japonica on Carolina Nature, from Will Cook

Lonicera japonica on the USDA Plants Database

Lonicera japonica at the Bugwood Wiki

Lonicera japonica on Wikipedia

Lonicera japonica on the USDA Forest Service's Fire Effects Information Database

Lonicera japonica at the University of Florida IFAS Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants

Lonicera japonica at the University of Connecticut Plant Database

Lonicera japonica on Plants for a Future, a resource and information centre for edible and otherwise useful plants

Lonicera japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle)

5/11/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Pepperell, MA
≈ 17 × 12" (44 × 29 cm) ID is uncertain

Lonicera japonica description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 16 Aug 2013.

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Lonicera japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle)

6/19/2011 · NJ
≈ 4½ × 3" (11 × 7.9 cm)

Lonicera japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle)

6/19/2011 · NJ
≈ 3½ × 2½" (9.8 × 6.6 cm)

Range:

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